Monday, August 04, 2008

Rock Moving on Vole Hill

"I have no more than twenty acres of ground," he replied, "the whole of which I cultivate myself with the help of my children; and our labor keeps off from us the three great evils - boredom, vice, and want." ~Voltaire

So... yesterday I tore Vole Hill apart and reconstructed it. It's bigger, faster and stronger than before.

Okay, not really... but it does look pretty good. I really should have taken "before" pictures, so you could see the utter destruction of the garden, but I didn't.

I moved rocks. Lots and lots and lots of rocks.

I dug up all the plants that were left because everything had to move. Why? Because my DH asked if I'd make the garden round instead of oval (it's easier to mow around that way).

I scrounged in my other gardens for more plants (thankfully, there is seldom a plant shortage here -- I jokingly call it "M's Nursery" because I give away TONS of plants every year. The ones I have propagate like crazy).

Then... I decided what needed to go where based on height and when it blooms. I have my huge chrysanthemum bush in the back now, because it blooms last and everything else will be cut down by then. I circled the tree with my miniature iris, because it only blooms for about five minutes, but stay green all year. Columbine is in the back because it blooms early and the flowers get quite tall, but the foliage isn't very pretty. The liatris is near the back on the edges. It has healthy, spiky green foliage and pretty spectacular tall purple spikes when it blooms. Near the front are my shorter plants: gallardia, russian sage and dianthus. In the very front is some low growing ground cover: dragons-blood sedum. I'll sprinkle annuals through the garden each year for continuous color.

AND... I moved my bird feeders out back, because that is what most likely attracted the voles to the area.

For now, this is the end result:



Everything is pretty immature, so it will fill in. And the big dirt patches will eventually be grass. And the small rocks in the front will go away after a bit -- I was using them as a guide to remind me how far up I could plant.

All in all, I'm satisfied. I'll probably plant some crocus bulbs right up front for some early spring blooms, but otherwise stick a fork in it -- it's done.

What was DH doing while I was hauling rocks? He finally built us some front steps!!

From this:


To this:


And he built it extra wide so I can put out flower arrangements in the spring.

YAY~

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I was going to do the Monday Morning Meme, but there was this question about blogs you read and which were your faves, and I just couldn't narrow it down, and didn't want to leave anyone out and then didn't want to build the links to everyone... it was too much to take this early. So I didn't do it... BUT... this was one question, and I admit to being a bit stymied.

3. What book have you started with low expectations, and finished with tears in your eyes it was so good? Now please share with us a book that you think people MUST read. Why this book?

I don't start books I have low expectations of. Ever. Not as an adult, in any case. I was (of course) force fed the classics as a child and disliked them all -- Steinbeck in particular. Blech. I haven't even read "Pride & Prejudice", though I've seen the movie (as I have all the Austen films, except "Emma").

Why would anyone start a book they think they'll hate on purpose? Just curious.

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I'll post a contest for Kitchen Matches upcoming release tonight or tomorrow. I was just too tired yesterday to think straight.

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10 comments:

MaryF said...

I didn't have LOW expectations for Into the Fire, but I didn't expect to love it. I haven't loved a Brockmann since Wild Card's story. But DANG - I read the last 100 pages last night and cried cried CRIED!!!! Sent Suz a gushing email, which she answered and I'm keeping forever.

Allie Boniface said...

Wow - love your garden! Let's hope the voles, well, don't...

keri mikulski :) said...

Nice garden! ;)

Sarita Leone said...

Your garden looks great now; when it fills in it's going to be a real knockout. Wow, a lot of hard work but the results are fabuluous! Way to go!

You've used some of my favorite flowers, too. I especially love columbine. How could anyone not? So pretty and delicate looking.

Nice job! Thanks for sharing. :)

Tori Lennox said...

I'm with you. There are plenty of books out there I want to read, so why would I read something I didn't think I'd like? Weird.

Jen of A2eatwrite said...

Your garden looks amazing.

I guess, in terms of low expectations, some of the classics that I was force fed in high school turned into lovely prizes, once I had the maturity and reading chops to really "get" them. Then some became faves. And some never will. I will never, ever, ever like Homer.

Dru said...

I like the look of your garden. Very nice.

I don't read books that I don't like. If while reading I start skipping pages, especially early on, I'll read the last chapter just to see how it ends.

Brandy said...

You're new and improved garden looks lovely. I wish I had your green thumb. *G* And the steps look nice, your hubs did a great job!
I don't start books I'm sure I won't like. There are enough books out there that I don't have to. *G*

I hope you're having a pleasant day!

Melissa said...

I don't read books I have low expectations, either. Why waste time. I give a book a chapter maybe two and if I'm not really liking it I won't finish it. Though I usually still read the last scene.

I'm so far behind with blog reading due to the conference so i have know idea what's been going on, but I was wondering how your writing is going?

anno said...

Gorgeous garden! I can't believe you moved all those rocks... hope you had a nice long hot bath afterwards, and maybe some chocolate, too!

Sometimes, when I'm having a hard time finding something to read, I'll pick up something at the library, figuring that maybe it will do, and then been pleasantly surprised. I know you don't enjoy her books, but Jennifer Weiner comes to mind.